Author Topic: WA State link  (Read 2124 times)

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Offline BlackSheep

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WA State link
« on: Mar 13, 2011, 08:59 PM »
I've been a 'lurker' for quite some time. I've been trying to read everything on the site before posting anything, so I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this or not.....

When I go to the State Laws and check out the WA laws, there is a link for more info, but it bring me VA info instead of WA. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

Offline LadyT

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Re: WA State link
« Reply #1 on: Mar 13, 2011, 10:02 PM »
I clicked that link as well and it did the same thing for me, but the laws are listed, I'm posting them just in case you missed them... Not too sure about the problem with that link... sorry

Washington

RCW 26.04.020
Prohibited marriages.
(b) When the husband and wife are nearer of kin to each other than second cousins, whether of the whole or half blood computing by the rules of the civil law; or
(c) When the parties are persons other than a male and a female.
(2) It is unlawful for any man to marry his father's sister, mother's sister, daughter, sister, son's daughter, daughter's daughter, brother's daughter or sister's daughter; it is unlawful for any woman to marry her father's brother, mother's brother, son, brother, son's son, daughter's son, brother's son or sister's son.

RCW 9A.64.020
Incest.
(1) A person is guilty of incest in the first degree if he engages in sexual intercourse with a person whom he knows to be related to him, either legitimately or illegitimately, as an ancestor, descendant, brother, or sister of either the whole or the half blood.
(2) A person is guilty of incest in the second degree if he engages in sexual contact with a person whom he knows to be related to him, either legitimately or illegitimately, as an ancestor, descendant, brother, or sister of either the whole or the half blood.
(3) As used in this section, "descendant" includes stepchildren and adopted children under eighteen years of age.
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Offline BlackSheep

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Re: WA State link
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2011, 08:28 PM »
Thank you LadyT for replying.

I'd love to know if there is a way to fix the link. I'd really like to know what the laws are regarding WA State laws concerning cousin couples. I know that it prohibits cousins getting married, but there seems to be a loop hole that they can get married in a 'LEGAL' state and come back to WA state & is accepted. What about relationships that aren't 'legally bond' elsewhere???? Is it illegal?? Could you be prosecuted for being with your cousin love???

Offline ColoradoMarried

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Re: WA State link
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2011, 12:57 AM »
BlackSheep,


I took a quick look at the Washington Revised Code (or Revised Code of Washington), the statutes concerning marriage.  The state's only "void" clause pertains to marriages of persons under age, incapable of consent, or marriages involving fraud.  However, in 1998, the state-level courts found that the state does not "recognize" any marriage from another state that would not be legal in Washington.  The case was specifically referring to same-sex marriage but could be extended to include any marriage not able to be legally formed in Washington.  As far as criminal charges go, sex between first cousins is not a crime in Washington state.  You can live together, have kids together, own a house together... whatever you want, but you can't get married *in* Washington state.


If you got married out of state and them moved to Washington, whether or not the state would "recognize" your marriage is really up in the air because there is no case history for out-of-state cousin marriage in Washington.  Could it become an issue?  If somehow the state found out and someone decided to sue to have your marriage declared "void" or to prevent the state from granting legal recognition, possibly.  Is it likely?  I doubt it, but that is a personal risk you would have to take.  When things like money (inheritance) are on the line, even closest of relatives can do some pretty crazy stuff.