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BobAndMary11

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BobAndMary11 last won the day on December 7 2016

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  1. Jen, Go to Maryland and get married; come back to Ohio and live happily ever after. UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF OHIO WESTERN DIVISION. Case No. 1:13-cv-501 on page 2 "... just as Ohio recognizes all other out-of-state marriages, if valid in the state performed, and even if not authorized nor validly performed under Ohio law, such as marriages between first cousins, marriages of certain minors, and common law marriages. That is, once you get married lawfully in one state, another state cannot summarily take your marriage away, because the right to remain married is properly recognized as a fundamental liberty interest protected by the Due Process Clause of the United States Constitution. U.S. Const. amend. XIV, § 1." The court document above specifically states that Ohio recognizes marriages between first cousins if the marriage is legally performed in another state. I know that Maryland will marry non resident cousins. As proof I submit the following: When my wife and I got our marriage license the clerk told us they get a lot of cousins from neighboring Pennsylvania and West Virginia. My first wife and current husband (first cousins) have always lived in Pennsylvania and were married by a JP in Elkton, MD. They have been married 29 years as of 10/16 and have 3 children, 2 grand children and 1 grandchild on the way.
  2. I should have posted the complete reference: UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF OHIO WESTERN DIVISION. Case No. 1:13-cv-501 states on page 2 "... just as Ohio recognizes all other out-of-state marriages, if valid in the state performed, and even if not authorized nor validly performed under Ohio law, such as marriages between first cousins, marriages of certain minors, and common law marriages. That is, once you get married lawfully in one state, another state cannot summarily take your marriage away, because the right to remain married is properly recognized as a fundamental liberty interest protected by the Due Process Clause of the United States Constitution. U.S. Const. amend. XIV, § 1." The court document above specifically states that Ohio recognizes marriages between first cousins if the marriage is legally performed in another state. I know that Maryland will marry non resident cousins. As proof I submit the following: When my wife and I got our marriage license the clerk told us they get a lot of cousins from neighboring Pennsylvania and West Virginia. My first wife and current husband (first cousins) have always lived in Pennsylvania and were married by a JP in Elkton, MD. They have been married 29 years as of 10/16 and have 3 children, 2 grand children and 1 grandchild on the way.
  3. Guest Lizzy, My first wife and I were married in Maryland when neither of us lived there (she was a resident of Pennsylvania and I of Delaware). My current wife (cousin) and I were married in Maryland (she was an Ohio resident and I lived in Maryland at the time). The clerk even mentioned to us that they see a lot if cousins coming to Cumberland County from nearby Pennsylvania and West Virginia to get married. As I mentioned in my post above, Ohio has stipulated in UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF OHIO WESTERN DIVISION. Case No. 1:13-cv-501 on page 2 "... just as Ohio recognizes all other out-of-state marriages, if valid in the state performed, and even if not authorized nor validly performed under Ohio law, such as marriages between first cousins, marriages of certain minors, and common law marriages. That is, once you get married lawfully in one state, another state cannot summarily take your marriage away, because the right to remain married is properly recognized as a fundamental liberty interest protected by the Due Process Clause of the United States Constitution. U.S. Const. amend. XIV, § 1." Maryland will legally marry first cousins even if neither is a resident. The funny (and ironic) thing is, my first wife also married her first cousin. They live in Pennsylvania (always have) and they were married in.... yep, Maryland!
  4. The ruling states "...just as Ohio recognizes all other out-of-state marriages, if valid in the state performed". So if a couple lives in Ohio and has a destination wedding to Florida and comes back to Ohio to live, the marriage would be recognized (as long as Florida has no law prohibiting non residents to marry). If your destination wedding is Maryland (where my first and my last wedding were performed), where it is legal to marry a first cousin, it stands to reason, your marriage would be recognized. Neither my first wife or I lived in Maryland at the time we were married there. Maryland does not require residency to be married in the state. Who's to say you went to another state to circumvent your home state's law or just because you wanted to be married somewhere else.
  5. This is from a court document in Ohio but the reference to the US Constitution makes it true in every state: "...once you get married lawfully in one state, another state cannot summarily take your marriage away, because the right to remain married is properly recognized as a fundamental liberty interest protected by the Due Process Clause of the United States Constitution. U.S. Const. amend. XIV, § 1."
  6. My wife and I were married in Maryland and now live in Ohio. No one ever questions the legality. Honestly, when was the last time you were asked to show your marriage license. We did have to produce divorce certificates from our previous marriages when we bought our house but I don't remember showing a marriage certificate. And our Maryland marriage certificate says right on it "First Cousins". I just found this from the UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF OHIO WESTERN DIVISION. Case No. 1:13-cv-501 states on page 2 "... just as Ohio recognizes all other out-of-state marriages, if valid in the state performed, and even if not authorized nor validly performed under Ohio law, such as marriages between first cousins, marriages of certain minors, and common law marriages. That is, once you get married lawfully in one state, another state cannot summarily take your marriage away, because the right to remain married is properly recognized as a fundamental liberty interest protected by the Due Process Clause of the United States Constitution. U.S. Const. amend. XIV, § 1."
  7. My wife lived in Ohio and I in Maryland when we married. Maryland has no limitation on marrying a cousin and Ohio has to honor the marriage. We chose a place (Frostburg) in between her children and mine. You can marry in any state that allows cousin marriage. I am not sure how Ohio could not honor it; we're married.
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