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MissPrice

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MissPrice last won the day on September 7 2019

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  1. It would of course be nice if a stranger on the internet could tell you definitively that your cousin is romantically interested in you. Unfortunately, the only one who can tell you that is her. She clearly enjoys flirting with you, but flirting doesn't always mean the desire for a relationship, as I'm sure you know. Good luck!
  2. Well, a couple of things: 1) it sounds like you need to figure out if in fact you do "want more", because at least the way you posed the question, it doesn't sound like you are clear if you do or not. 2) It sounds like your cousin is dependent on you for her living situation, which, if true, means you need to tread very very lightly. You two are obviously close, but all of the interactions you describe are platonic, and you're the one who has asked for more intimacy. You could easily put her in a position where she feels pressured into something she doesn't really want with you. Also, as you
  3. As someone who lives in Ohio and married my first cousin in another state: no, there is nothing about your marriage certificate that should indicate your biological relationship. Ohio accepts marriages from other states regardless of whether they would give a certificate for that marriage. So legally (and I'm not a lawyer, just well-informed on this issue) you should be fine.
  4. It's too bad that your mom is being so closed-minded. It sounds like you have a good plan for handling the situation though, and I doubt you'll lose your family over this. There might be some distance for awhile with specific people, but there's a very good chance they'll learn to accept it over time when they realize they can't change it, and it's not a bad thing. Good luck!
  5. That's a tough situation. I haven't been there, but I've often thought that if my cousin (first cousin, now husband) and I had gotten together when we were younger/ when I was still financially dependent on my dad in college, he would have totally freaked out. The way it went for us, I was 28, financially independent, and living in a different state. I'd had feelings for my cousin forever, but it never occurred to me that a relationship was possible until then. My dad wasn't thrilled when I first told him, but he also knew that he didn't get a say, and he'd had several years to deal with me be
  6. That must be very frustrating for you, I get that. Do keep in mind though that she's pregnant and working. Also, it's possible you overwhelmed her with the gifts. It's a beautiful gesture, but she may feel awkward about accepting them. She may be unsure what your expectations are, and not in a position emotionally to engage with you, and craving pickles on ice cream with potato chips, and having hot flashes, and terrified of being a mother. My point is just that she has an awful lot going on right now, you know? After the father of her unborn child left her, she might distrust men in general,
  7. Just a friendly outside perspective here, but it kinda sounds like you are pushing too hard. The last time you posted, the plan was that you would go see her and talk to her in person once you were over the flu. You still haven't seen her in person, correct? In the last message you sent her, you talk about "the promise you both made", but it's unclear to me from what you've said when she promised you anything. Also, it's great that you want to help her and her baby out, but she doesn't owe you for that. If you do think she does, it wasn't a gift. Had I had the opportunity, I would have advised
  8. I agree with all of that. If someone is looking for a fling, or a fun summer, or some drama (yuck), looking for any of that with a cousin is a terrible idea. Not every relationship can (or should) turn into something serious, but a relationship with a cousin is serious from the moment it starts, whether or not that's the plan. A cousin is a connection no matter what. and if someone gets hurt and the romantic relationship is over, that familial bond still exists. That's a lifetime of possible pain and awkward encounters. It's my opinion that anyone who wants a relationship with a cousin n
  9. She mentions that she wants to see you twice in a short conversation, she doesn't want you to buy her anything specifically (i.e., clearly not just interested in what you can do for her), and she says "I love you" first. Those are all good signs; she is clearly very fond of you. Definitely don't delay going to see her once you are feeling better! It sounds like she's in a tough situation, and that she wants you close. Whether or not she ever loves you the way you want, if you love her, you should absolutely be there for her. Keep us updated!
  10. If you are there for her and her child, she will get the message, even if you don't tell her directly. Good luck!
  11. If you are as serious about your cousin as it sounds like you are, and you are both currently single, you should speak up! We don't get many chances in life to be truly happy with someone, and if you think that highly of her, and are willing to commit yourself to her like that, then she has the right to know that someone loves her like that, and you have the right to give yourself a chance at that dream. I carried a secret torch for my cousin from childhood, but never thought he would return those feelings. I was 29 when I finally told him, and he kissed me. We got married last spring. W
  12. Hi Lilly - as someone who is happily married to her first cousin, I certainly don't think there is anything wrong with your feelings. However, you said he's fifteen. That's too young for a romantic relationship with a cousin (and for most guys, too young for a relationship at all). If you are seriously interested in him, wait until the two of you are both older. The age difference won't matter then. It's okay to feel how you feel, but try to put those feelings away for now. Be friends, concentrate on becoming the kind of woman you want to be, and if in a few years you still feel about him the
  13. I'm a little confused by your story 1) you two are dating, but you've never actually met? ("I haven't met him in person yet, but I plan to very soon.") 2) He's already broken up with you twice, once getting together with someone else immediately afterwards?, and 3) You are both 18, correct? Assuming I got all three of those things right, this doesn't sound like a serious thing. Maybe meet him before you start talking about forever, in any context.
  14. If you are twenty and your cousin is five years younger, that means she's fifteen. That's too young to "date", even if the two of you aren't in a physical relationship. On the upside, it also means that her feelings about you might change significantly as she gets older, especially if the two of you are friends. Like Lady C and KC said, five years isn't a big difference... once you are both adults. I know it's tough, but I would highly recommend trying to put your feelings on the back burner for now, and concentrating on college and friends and all the fun things about being twenty. If you are
  15. I would say that regardless of gender, passion during sex does not necessarily mean anything outside of the bedroom. However, you said in your thread that your cousin told you he imagines a future with you. I would say that's about the best evidence you're going to get that he cares about you.
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