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      Get Smart on the Web   09/16/2016

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Bossbelling

Planning a baby

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Hello there!well, I am just new here at this site..and I just want to ask some advices from you guys..

we've been together with my husband for 17yrs..well,15yrs (girlfriends/boyfriends) and 2yrs (married)..

and I really Really want to have a baby but we are scared that our baby will not.get normal..

i just wanna ask if there is a way to avoid having of it please..

thanks 

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your baby will most likely be perfect! please read our genetics info! you can access it from the menu under "info pages". i think that will ease a lot of your concerns, and then we can better address any specific questions that you may still have. also, most insurance companies will cover genetic counseling, so that would be a wise thing to do... even couples who aren't cousins can benefit from genetic counseling, because MOST genetic problems are not a result from kinship between the parents. what a genetic counselor does is take a thorough look at your family's medical history on both sides, and then if there are any red flags, will run tests to see if the two of you are carriers of the defective gene. 

the shortest answer to the question though is this... the average non-related couple has a 97% chance of having a perfectly normal, healthy bouncing baby. you and your husband (assuming you are first cousins) have a 95% chance of having a perfectly normal, healthy, bouncing baby. :)

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You don't even have to go to a genetic counselor; your OB-GYN can order any of a number of genetic tests for you.  Even if your health insurance doesn't cover genetic testing, some companies have special rates currently, because they are trying to expand their market. That being said, Lady C is right, being first cousins only raises the risk of birth defects slightly. This is higher for specific populations where cousin marriage is common, so the more you know about your shared ancestry, the better.

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