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      Get Smart on the Web   09/16/2016

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Guest longtimelurker

Any other nonbelievers here?

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Guest jayD
I am not gay, but I have friends who are bi/gay/lesbian, and I find it downright offensive that people could call that a sin. Why in the world would somebody CHOSE to be gay? With all the baggage it brings it just doesnt make sense.

Personally I don't really care what anybody does as long as they live a normal lifestyle. But many of these people don't want to act normal. They want to change things so it's considered fine to stay single your whole life and just have a bunch of gay flings and never have your own family. What kind of life is that? If they are allowed to succeed we will all suffer. They are rebellious. They are proud of having no goals and no respect!

Well, I was brought up very Christian and truly and honestly believed it. I tried very hard to maintain my faith in the face of disbelief. The more I investigated things though... the less I could believe any of it.

I think maybe you should take into account that religion is also about living a certain kind of life. In Islam it is about submitting to God. I am not saying what you should do of course. I don't even know what I am doing. But maybe what LadyC is getting at, too, is that religion is not just about a huge list of details but is also about what it means to you personally.

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good post JayD. all of it.

by the way, when you have a relationship with Christ, all the details, the "do's and don'ts" that people think it is quit seeming like "dos and don'ts".

it's like when you're in a relationship. the rules of engagement (no pun intended! well.... maybe a little intended!) require that you spend time with the one you love, that you communicate with them, that you not lie to them, not cheat on them, not treat them like crap, yada yada yada.

when you're single, you may think that being in a relationship is way too much work, because it would cramp your lifestyle. you want to be free to go hang out with the guys, drinking, carousing, chasing women, etc, and having a girlfriend just doesn't fit that scenario. too many dos and don'ts.

but then when you fall in love, suddenly your perspective on life changes. your goals change. you WANT to spend time with the one you love. chasing other women, hanging out at the titty bars, and acting like an egotistical jerk aren't so appealing anymore, because the love of your life is offended by that kind of behaviour. doing those things would inevitably separate you from the love of your life, and you don't want to be separated from her.

same with a relationship with God. to an outsider, it looks like a bunch of rules and regulations. to the believer though, it's what we want to do because we know it's what makes our first love happy. (and Jesus should always be our first love... because He will, without a doubt, be the last one standing in the gap for us when everything else fails.)

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Guest longtimelurker

I think maybe you should take into account that religion is also about living a certain kind of life. In Islam it is about submitting to God. I am not saying what you should do of course. I don't even know what I am doing. But maybe what LadyC is getting at, too, is that religion is not just about a huge list of details but is also about what it means to you personally.

I think I fudged up the quoting... sorry.

Anyhow, it is about living a certain kind of life and I did exactly that. The submitting to God part is difficult though when there is really no tangible communication. I believe some people are more inclined to be religious than others... I am not one of those individuals.

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Are we implying gay people cannot love? I know plenty of gays that arent rebellious. In fact, a lot of gays are just the opposite of what you are stating.

Of course they want to change things! They want to be able to live the life LadyC just explained in great detail like any other couple. The want marriage for a reason! DUH. What makes you think they want "a bunch of gay flings and stay single." That makes no sense at all. If that were the case they would not be fighting for the right to marry.

Im appalled that cousin lovers are against gays. It seems so counter productive.

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Guest jayD on his iPhone

by "single" i mean single in the traditional sense. gay lovers don't count. these people can't have their own families if they're single, because they can't have kids. and they want to make that normal, that kind of lifestyle. well its not normal. its just narcissism, deliberately frittering themselves away.

i know a guy who was so eager to have grandchildren. but his only son broke off his engagement with a woman and decided to have a gay affair. so she punched him in the face with the ring. good for her. now his son lives in a mansion with a man and the guy seldom hears from him. but the guy still talks with the almost-daughter-in-law, as if he was still hoping for what will never come. THATS why all this is so wrong.

ok i've said my piece, thats it for this topic.

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scrubanizer, you can be appalled all you want. for those of us who are christians, the bible forbids homosexual relationships, and supports cousin marriage. (it does NOT, however, mean we condemn or hate gays. i have a very good friend who is gay, and have had other gay friends throughout the years.)

and what the heck is counter productive? you have to really, really stretch to find similarity between gay rights and cousin marriage. a lot of people like to think there is, but there isn't. our plight is nearly a mirror image of miscegeny laws, the laws that once forbade interracial marriage.

in any case, this thread is about who is or isn't a believer, so let's put a sock in the whole gay debate. we're getting off topic.

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Guest hes4me

Wow this is really...yeah.

I'll be willing to admit I might be wrong about my points of sinning, but take it with the note that I was taught what I stated by my very christian baptist preacher.

Personally I don't really care what anybody does as long as they live a normal lifestyle. But many of these people don't want to act normal. They want to change things so it's considered fine to stay single your whole life and just have a bunch of gay flings and never have your own family. What kind of life is that? If they are allowed to succeed we will all suffer. They are rebellious. They are proud of having no goals and no respect!

This stereotype makes my heart hurt. I will not go into all the ways that it's wrong/inaccurate but I will say that these people are just as likely to have a marriage & children as straight people are.

so she punched him in the face with the ring. good for her.

:blink: What?

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Did any of you see the recent series on PBS called "God in America"?  If not, you can see it at the pbs portal on-line.  The series was excellent.  It expanded on ideas and concepts I learned in Sociology of Religion that I took in university.

The main idea of religion and society (or sociology) is that individuals study an idea or ideas, such as the Bible, and then they co-opt those ideas into their lives.  From that spawns different churches and branches of religions and ideologies, which in the U.S. particularly, often turns political.  So then you end up with one branch of the Christian church hooking up with a certain politician to get a certain agenda done.

In otherwords no matter what religion exists or is created, people will absorb those ideas, compare those ideas to their other perceptions and experiences in life, and then inform you what their beliefs are.  Sometimes they inform those around them about what their beliefs are by their actions in life.

After seeing the excellent documentary series I mentioned above, and seeing how it expanded my Sociology of Religion course from university, I came to the conclusion that perhaps God just wants to see what we'll do with any set of ideas, from the Bible, or not.  It is perhaps through living and thinking about ideas and trying to implement them that we show God who we are, what we believe, and what we stand for.

God tells us in the Bible the right set of ideas to incorporate into our lives in order for us to become One with God again, as we did before the Garden of Eden.  And life has proven again and again that it is ideas such as love, co-operation, understanding and caring that build a good society.  When ideas and actions related to hate, selfishness and greed are injected into society, societies become corrupted and start to fall apart.  And this we can see most recently with the economic crisis started in the U.S. in 2008, when Lehman Brothers and Goldman Sachs collapsed.  Greed and corruption are the main things that caused the economic crisis.

So, we can name our ideas and beliefs whatever we want.  But the history of life on earth proves again and again that positive thoughts, emotions and actions build happy, healthy, productive societies.  Evil thoughts and actions cause corruption, disruption and kaos in our societies, and those things tear our societies apart, not build them up.

The Bible says that God is Love.  So if one choose not to believe that God is an intelligence that runs the universe, even if they just believed that God is Love, they would be striving towards all that which is loving and helpful and co-operative.

The science of physics has even figured out though, that there is an intelligence that lives right outside of our universe, which adjusts the elements of the universe every day to keep our earth alive and going.  To see where I'm getting this idea watch the "Elegant Universe" another excellent documentary series from PBS.

The documentary series "God in America" showed me that I too, like all other people, co-opt their religious education (or lack thereof) into their other beliefs and perceptions and experiences and then I go on and live my life.  In otherwords, I put my own subjective slant on my religious beliefs and the practice of those, just like everyone else does.

And I guess based on that reality that exists with all people, God judges each individual from there and decides the progress of each individual from that point.

Perhaps a place to start on religion for any individual is the decision as to whether you want to live a life full of loving, caring, helpful thoughts, or live a life of selfish, greedy, uncaring thoughts... with the applicable actions.  From one of those 2 axes you will design your life, and you can be sure that God is watching, recording and judging that life for a total that will determine the next step for that person.

Of course, you can't be sure of that if you don't believe in God.  But even if you don't believe in God, you must be aware that love exists and co-operation and helpfulness exists, and that greed and selfishness exist.  Choose your thoughts and actions carefully people!

:)

Ambra

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Fascinating thread!  I just glanced over it (third thread I'm looking at after a fairly long hiatus while working for Uncle Sam).

Just to play the smarty-pants that I am, I would argue that there is no such thing as a non-believer.  Of course, I understand that the OP meant non-believer in God.  As a junior theologian (self-declared - I'm a Seminary student of the Southern Baptist persuasion, grinding my way through a Masters in Divinity) I must confess that while I'm no longer surprised at self-proclaimed atheists and agnostics, they do fascinate me. 

Let me preface the remainder of my comments by saying that, though I'm a Seminarian and "Junior Preacher" of sorts, I'm an unusual creature.  I was raised by parents who had no use for God.  My father declared that if there is a God, that God must hate him and he hated Him back.  My mother had a bizarre concept of God and absolutely no use for religion in any form.  As a consequence, I had NO religious upbringing in the traditional sense.  I was an agnostic with serious doubts and questions until well into my adult years.  Indeed, even today, I continue to have certain doubts at times for which I seek answers.  In other words, I'm not a cookie-cutter, raised in the front pew every Sunday, holier-than-thou, never sinned a day in my life Christian (and I've never met one, even the ones who seem to pretend they are).

I have little wonder of what makes one decide against belief in God.  More often than not, I hear arguments not so much against belief in God or even the basic tenets of Christianity but rather against the Christianity they've seen.  I am then reminded that I may be the only Bible someone ever reads.  It makes me all the more aware of the seriousness of my own misdeeds.

On one hand, I can appeal to the logical and cosmological arguments for God.  Logically, I see the Earth and everything in it as a series of effects.  Every effect has a cause.  We can trace many of these effects to their cause and usually each cause is really just an effect of a previous cause.  In logic, every effect must have a cause; however, not every cause requires a previous cause.  In other words, logic allows for and indeed necessitates an uncaused cause.  That uncaused cause, the Prime Mover that set the wondrous works of our Universe into motion, I shall call God.  Of course, that doesn't mean that this Prime Mover had any intent, design, or even personality.

Cosmologically speaking, we could look toward a Universe that expands and contracts continuously.  We could even speak of parallel universes, or a "multiverse".  The problem with this is that it necessitates the existence of multiple concrete infinities.  While we can use the abstract concept of infinity in mathematics, in the concrete Universe which is governed by laws of physics, there can be no concrete infinities.  Their existence would create absurdities that render even talking about the subject pointless.  As an example, picture little Johnny riding his tricycle in a 20 meter circle an infinite number of times.  Around this, his father drives his car on a 2,000 meter track an infinite number of times.  Both have traveled an infinite distance but Johnny's infinity is smaller than his father's.  Mathematically, this doesn't make sense.  It's about as useful and instructive as trying to divide by zero (it is possible to divide by zero, but the result is "undefined" because it doesn't make any sense).  The very possibility would produce such absurdities in our real and physical Universe that the Universe itself could not survive it (nor could our sanity).

Design betrays a designer.  I use the tired old "watch" argument.  The complexity of the Universe is so great that for it to be an accident is a far greater leap of blind faith than any other religion could possibly require.  Indeed, our position within the Universe itself is perfect not only for sustainment of life but for our ability to observe the Universe itself.  Were we closer to the center of our galaxy, the brightness caused by the higher concentration of stars around us would blind even our best telescopes to the rest of the stars out there (much like city lights obscure so many stars that you can see out in the country where there are no lights).  The complexity of the Earth, its ability to sustain life (move it just 1% closer or farther in relation to the sun and we all die, tilt it on its axis just a couple degrees and most the planet is uninhabitable, give us an extra moon, take it away, or move it closer or farther and the effects on tides and weather are devastating... and that's just a small portion of the balance) make belief in a cosmic accident also a great leap of faith.  So, I would ask, if you found a watch in the desert, would you assume that the parts happened to fall together after a massive explosion at a watch parts factory or would you assume it was put together by a deliberate designer?

Evolution is compelling and much circumstantial evidence exists to give us the impression that it did indeed occur.  But I ask you, are you satisfied enough with the evidence to die for it?  In other words, if it were a court of law and your friend were "accused" of evolution, do you believe the evidence is so great that you would convict with the sentence being death?  Of course not.  The evidence is circumstantial and incomplete.  There are way too many questions to be asked.  According to Darwin's theory, there would have to be literally billions of failed mutations - attempts of variations that nature tried but just didn't pan out.  Where are they?  Alternatively, assuming a species gives genetic rise to a wholly other species (that is, for simplicity's sake, a Bobcat gives birth to a common domestic cat).  In that case, there are two unresolved complications.  1) There would be genetic throwbacks where the parent species randomly gives birth to an ancestor or vice versa (the variation repeats from the parent species) - this has never been observed even on the micro level; and 2) Why is there gender?  Sexual reproduction continues to baffle evolutionary biologists to this day.  It is grossly inefficient.  Why not asexual reproduction or even, for genetic variation, bisexual reproduction?  How and when did gender first evolve?  How did the creature creating the first gender happen to have both male and female offspring at close enough intervals to allow them to find one another and reproduce?  I ask these questions in earnest as one who has looked for the answers.  Sadly, the greatest Evolutionary Biologist of our time is too busy writing childish books about why he hates Christianity (with absolutely no research into what it actually is) all under the guise of scientific reference.  In short, Richard Dawkins is really just writing pep-talks, preaching to the choir of his own religious persuasion, and like so many of my own religious background, does so without a very closed mind.

For the personality of the Designer, we must turn to the concept put forth in Genesis - that God created man and woman in His own image.  Is there evidence of this?  I submit that each person has a profound understanding of some basic moral absolutes.  We may deny these all we like and insist on moral relativism (which is an absolute of its own), but wrong us personally just once and we quickly demonstrate where our absolutes lie.  I submit to you that rape is wrong.  For a person to tell me that they don't believe in moral absolutes, he would first have to argue with that moral imperative.

The question then becomes one of seeking the source of our morals.  If the source is man, then our morals are indeed subjective and rape may not always be wrong but rather is wrong only because I say so (even if you agree, clearly there are one or two among us who do not).  Indeed, our system of morals, our ability to judge right from wrong, requires that we appeal to a higher authority than ourselves.

Morally and philosophically, if there is no God, we're all in big trouble.  Without a God, and especially in light of the alternate theory of secularist/naturalist evolutionary theory, any plea for social justice is really a plea in vain.  Indeed, evolutionary theory demands the exact opposite of social justice.  It's very nature implies and demands racism, sexism, and utter moral bankruptcy in order for the "fittest" and "strongest" to propagate for the greater good of the human species.  Indeed, this is exactly what Darwin was talking about!  Indeed, the full title of "The Origin of the Species" is actually, "The Origin of the Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life".  While one can argue about what he meant by "races", his other writings make clear that Darwin himself was both racist and sexist.

No, I cannot empirically prove (nor disprove) the existence of God.  That does not mean that God does not exist.  Indeed, it is bad science and logic to assume that just because I cannot prove something means I can dismiss it's very possibility out of hand.  I could go on, but hopefully, I've at the very least opened the door for those who have doubts about God (as we all do whether we admit them or not) to consider and test the hypothesis.

Since the question was about belief versus non-belief, I'll stop here without going into any detail about the Bible itself, any particular moral beliefs, the history of the Christian church, and so on.

God Bless,

CM

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Guest Voyager

Saying in my country:

Everyone needs to believe, I believe I need a drink after such a heavy disourse.  :biggrin:

To believe in God is one thing, but to believe in morality is quite another.

Morality is often strenghtened by faith, or even enforced.

But you can have very high moral standards without believing (adhering to a faith).

The opposite is also true, some people I have known have a great faith, but show they don't really uphold the mores of said faith.

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Certainly, many people without a religious belief in God behave in ways that are moral.  Paul discusses this in his letter to the Romans.  It makes perfect sense given the concept of man being created specifically in the "image of God."  However, the fact that non-Christians behave in moral ways, even ways that are far more "moral" than many if not most Christians does not mean that there is no absolute morality.  It does not mean that God isn't the source of that morality.  Likewise, that Christians behave in immoral ways does not mean that there is not a God from whom all moral authority derives.  By their choice and free agency, Christians can and often do behave in ways that are counter to God's will.  This is why so many of us are considered hypocrites (and rightly so!).

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I believe in a god.

I just don't fall for this religion Bull because all religions have some sort of flaw in them.

& wouldn't believing in flaws account as a "sin?"

I was raised in a highly religious family of Hindus, yet I still find all religions the same.

/Sorryfortheoldtopicbump

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Guest crazygirl21

Poke, believing that we as humans are hopelessly flawed and in need of a savior is the essential and basic principle of  Christianity.  :smiley: I would think believing in no flaws would be a sign of arrogance which is a sin. Also the main source for what is wrong and right regardless of belief or not is the bible. To believe the bible or God is flawed is a sin however because the bible says god is without sin and the bible is without error. Any mistake or error would invalidate the entire thing.

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besides, the reason religions are all flawed is because they are all MAN'S attempts to attain holiness.

christianity is a RELATIONSHIP between individuals, flawed as we are, with the one living (and flawless) God through His Son, Jesus Christ. it doesn't make the individual perfect by any means. we're still human, and as long as we live on earth, we're going to succomb to our sin nature. what it does mean though, is that we have accepted the atonement of the blood that was shed by Jesus. He ransomed us. We no longer have to face the penalty of eternal separation from God, because we have entered into that personal relationship with the one who paid the ultimate price for our sins.

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Hes4me, I think you are a Deist.

I was raised a Baptist but I'm well, I don't know what it's called (if it's called anything?)

I do believe in God but I don't believe the Bible is anything more than just a book. I don't believe that God affects your life just observes. I believe in heaven/hell but I don't believe in getting saved (more of if you live as a good person, heaven. if not, hell). I don't believe that God answers prayers or cares how/what you worship or what religion you choose to be. I also don't believe in God 'sparing' you, when it's your time you go.

That's not really what you asked but I just wanted you to know your not the only nonchristian  :give_heart:

Oh PS, I'm also prochoice which I was informed (many times) means that I cannot possibly be a christian  :scratch_ones_head:

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Guest ArkansasRockNRoluhhhh

I would call myself a skeptical agnostic.  I'm open to the possibility that there could be a God, but I'm not gonna hold my breath on that one.

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Guest Macky

So  even though I think the Bible is a complete BS story I'm still  Christian because I believe in God? (I'm not getting snippy I'm actually  asking)

I say "was raised Baptist" because I was raised with the  understanding that I turn out Baptist, there was no question in my  parents mind, that's how my brothers turned out & that's how they  believed I would turn out. Even as a child I remember not believing what  was preached to me, I could see the contradictions of what was said but  I was too often shut up by my parents & preacher because you aren't  supposed to question such things you just have faith that it is what's  right. Without actually saying it, it was made clear that if you had  doubts/questions then you didn't believe & that meant you were a bad  christian.

This question comes at a weird time for me because I am actually questioning a lot of my beliefs.

I  am of the thought that questioning is what builds belief. Many  Christian religions as well as Islam don't allow questioning as people  tend to ask very hard and embarrassing questions.

Early Christian  and Islamic thinking involved a lot of questioning. Over the centuries,  as these religions evolved the leaders tried to plaster over the cracks  in logic and this has made much of the beauty of the original spiritual  ideas become hidden.

You are right in saying you were "raised  Baptist" because that means you were given the Baptist point of view of  God and your relationship with however he/she/it/they are made to appear  to you in your mind. Some people are perfectly happy living their  parent's religion, but there are many questers. These are people that  need to come to an understanding of their relationship with the vast  power they feel moving around them.

To be a successful quester,  you do need to empty your mind of all the "junk" that had been stuffed  into your brain earlier. I call it junk because until it has been sorted  out and you can determine what is Ultimate Truth and what is BS, you  cannot begin to create your own theology. I had to do this at one time. I  chose to replace all the Christian (western) idea with Eastern ideas.  Which for me centered around Zen Buddhist thought. Since the two  philosophies have no overlap I was able to better discern what things  are Universal Truths and which things were given me to believe before I  could choose.

There are only about a dozen spiritual laws, and  none of them have to do with morals or rules. Sorting them out from all  the chaff is what gives a quester a personal theology that while seems  to be unique at first, is really what is behind all esoterical spiritual  religions once they are stripped of all the layers of plaster, paint and gilde applied by centuries of traditions and distortions by religious politicking.

One  might ask if there is a danger in being a seeker or quester, and there  indeed is a danger. The risk is that one can get lost out on a false  path or follow a false leader and become even less hopeful of finding a  true path. Being a skeptic and slow to embrace any idea will build a  foundation of rock.

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Those are some good thoughts, Macky. If your religion doesn't allow you to ask questions, it is a controlling, unhealthy mind game. I've heard lots of Christians insist that we shouldn't even question God. Excuse me, but God is the one with all the answers.

We have to asking questions. I figure that God gave me a mind, and I'm gonna use it!  :drink1:

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Guest kwilkins

I was actually baptized as a Catholic though chose to be a non believer as I grew up.  I have no problems with people who are big on the religion sense but I am not quite a fan of those who go about and proclaim and sway you over to join their group, which is something that is sort of a blunder for me concerning how religion works with believe that you surely cannot force someone else's throat.

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In some form or another, you see that in every aspect of life.  Why did you have to go to school?  Why do public schools exist at all?  Why should I not kill the guy whose reckless driving just about caused me to crash at 70 MPH?  Why shouldn't I be allowed to force any woman I desire to have sex with me if that's my preference?  The second you evaluate any rule, law, or moral imperative and assert that it ought to be one way or another, you have done exactly what you claim to dislike.

I assert that there are many willful agnostics - people who choose not to seek to know one way or another about the existence or nature of God - but there are very few true atheists (with a little 'a'; Atheist with a capital 'A' is more of a proper noun for a collective of people who are mostly humanist and agnostic).

However, to the "non-believers", I pose this question:  In the absence of a moral, perfect, omniscient, and transcendent God, what purpose does life serve?

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Guest anonymous98

However, to the "non-believers", I pose this question:  In the absence of a moral, perfect, omniscient, and transcendent God, what purpose does life serve?

Living. I think life is its own purpose: growing up, loving, laughing, working and building a better world for future generations. Of course not all atheists will agree with me on that, but we'll all say that it's certainly not to serve a god, but to serve each other why we're here. Like someone said below, to believe in god is one thing; to have a morality is quite another :)

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Living. I think life is its own purpose: growing up, loving, laughing, working and building a better world for future generations. Of course not all atheists will agree with me on that, but we'll all say that it's certainly not to serve a god, but to serve each other why we're here. Like someone said below, to believe in god is one thing; to have a morality is quite another :)

I, for myself am an atheist, howeverI think that even if we are here, there will not be a "God" to tell us what we do, we do what we want to do, what feels rght to do, in this society we see that there are many different cultures, what we so may shock someone else, but we do it, not because we are selfish and we do not care for our race, but because we think it is right. I'm not going to listen to someone who pray's for "God" or any other so called divinity. I do what I believe in, and this is independant of the other's opinions. If we start living for others then we are going nowhere but towards a dead end.

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Guest Jorge

Yeah, I just got here, and I'll have you know you're not alone... god is or isnt be there, and our belief in it/him/her/whatever doesnt change the outcome. The same goes for the afterlife, what we believe doesnt change the requirements for heaven or hell (if there is one) and I live a morally good life, so maybe whoever/whatever lets people in heaven can overlook what I believe and look at the good or bad I've done and judge me based on that.

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It's nice to believe that one is in charge, accountable only to one self for his actions.  Atheists commonly charge that people believe in God because it's scary to believe that we are all alone in this universe.  I believe the opposite is true.  If we're the best the universe has to offer and we exist by random cosmic coincidence, there's nothing scary about that at all because it means my actions, good or bad (whatever those terms now mean) are totally irrelevant and I'm basically as close to being "God" as it gets.  No, it can be pretty scary realizing that every action is accountable and to realize that I am NOT God.  It's much nicer to judge my own actions through my own lens of morality, right and wrong, and weigh them on a scale, hoping that my good outweighs my bad.  Naturally, that should be enough as long as I say so and am comfortable with that balance.... right?

Wrong.  To define a "morally good life", one must first locate the source that defines what is "moral" - that defines "good" or "bad".  If I am that source, I'm set because it is impossible to fail if I'm the judge!  Of course, that also fails to answer the question about the purpose and value of life in the absence of a divine and purposeful creator.

Does our belief in a divine creator change the outcome?  Well, if the Creator says it does then it does.  If it doesn't change the outcome, again, we're back to the purpose and value of life.

On the other hand, is there fear in the absence of God?  Yes, or at least there ought to be.  The idea that we are alone (or alone enough given the distance to the next likely inhabited planet) and that we are fully in charge may seem liberating at first... until you look around and realize just how messed up humanity really is.  That's when you realize that "good" has no more purpose or value than "evil".  That's when you realize that for all of the "good" you do, any effort to stave off "evil" is only an effort to delay the inevitable - your death, at which point all of the good or evil you did becomes totally irrelevant.  Even to those who were alive with you who were "blessed" or "cursed" by your presence will die within 80-100 years of your death and so again, you and your entire life become irrelevant.

Believing that this life has no purpose and that life itself has no value should scare anyone because the natural result is the wanton destruction of life for the convenience of the empowered.  In that world view, "evil" has tremendous value as an "equalizing force" and so should be tolerated.

It is illogical to believe that God (or a divine and purposeful creator) does not exist.  If such a creator exists (and logic dictates that it must be so), logic further dictates that the creator must have will or intent to create in order to do so.  Such a creator must necessarily exist external to the creation and having the power to create, would also have the power to destroy.  So, the remaining questions are not whether or not a divine and purposeful creator exists but rather are about the nature and character of that Creator.

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